Welcome to the weird and wonderful world of record covers from the golden age of LPs


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The beach is back

beach

Philips record compilation from France with a cut by Brigitte Bardot.  Nice cheesecake cover with portable turntable from the 1960′s.

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A perfect 8 1/2

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Photo by Jerry Schatzburg     (Blonde on Blonde outtake)

My newest, favorite sexy starlet, Italian actress Claudia Cardinale.  A poor man’s Sophia Loren?  A rich man’s dream?  I first saw her in the western The Professionals with Burt Lancaster and Lee Marvin.  She was also in Fellini’s 8 1/2 and the Pink Panther with Peter Sellers (who also recorded with and loved Sophia Loren btw).  Her photo was also featured on Dylan’s Blonde On Blonde album,  then it was removed making the original issues more valuable.  Anyway, she’s beautiful and it’s nice to see her on the cover of this Japanese record.  Perhaps a scene from one of her films?  Can anyone help with that?

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An eyefull by the Eiffel

MDS00060Andre Popp!  Fontana Records (France)

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (19 votes, average: 3.63 out of 5)
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Boy’s in the hood

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Danny Boy et ses Penitents  Ripcordi Records (France) (1961)

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (16 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5)
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Puss n’ Boobs

cat

(We’d also accept Kitties n’ Titties)  “Organo Romantico”  Leon Segovia  MATE Records  (1975)

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (28 votes, average: 3.75 out of 5)
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Don’t fear the Reeperbahn

 

popeye

“Vom Hofbrauhaus zur Reeperbahn”  Odeon Records (Germany)

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (21 votes, average: 3.43 out of 5)
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Is he dead in the back of the van?

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Brother McQueen and the Queens  “God’s Not Dead at My House”  Melody Records  I found a great blog today.  Check out The Good, Bad & Ugly Gospel Records site.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (34 votes, average: 3.97 out of 5)
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The circle game

MDS00051

“Vamos Todos Cirandar em Hi-Fi”  Stelinha Egg e as Meninas da Casa de Lazaro  Odeon Records (Brazil)

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (23 votes, average: 2.70 out of 5)
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In a sentimental mood

MDS00050

“Emotions”  Norrie Paramor and his Orchestra  Columbia Records (UK)

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (29 votes, average: 3.72 out of 5)
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Keeping Hope alive

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The Elmo Hope Trio with Frank Butler and Jimmy Bond on HIFI Records (1960)  Here’s Barfly.

Pianist and composer Elmo Hope’s music might best be compared with that of Herbie Nichols. Both men shared some of Bud Powell’s intensity, Thelonious Monk’s inventive whimsy and, at times, hints of young Cecil Taylor’s realistic approach to the impossible. Over the years, both Nichols and Hope have achieved posthumous respect from an international jazz community which is itself marginalized. While Herbie Nichols could be said to have been ignored to death, Elmo Hope’s life and work were grievously complicated and ultimately extinguished (in 1967 at the age of 44) by the same narcotic plague that afflicted so many of his contemporaries.

Born in 1923, St. Elmo Sylvester Hope was the son of West Indian immigrants who settled in New York. He grew up with Bud Powell, studying J.S. Bach and dreaming of new concepts in modern music. Hope’s first recordings were with trumpeter Joe Morris, whose little R&B band boasted such innovative young minds as Johnny Griffin, Percy Heath and Philly Joe Jones. When in 1953 Alfred Lion gave Hope his first opportunity to record as a leader, he chose Heath and Jones to catalyze the eight tracks issued on New Faces, New Sounds.

Even as some of his music rippled with the restless energy of Herbie Nichols, Hope also made a point of composing and performing ritualistic reveries of profound and breathtaking slowness, sometimes drifting into a trance-like space where the listener may follow in order to contemplate the mysteries of life and death, of creativity and collective improvisation. Like Herbie Nichols, Elmo Hope imprinted everything he wrote and played with an indelibly personalized, harmonically advanced language.   (AllMusic)

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (29 votes, average: 3.28 out of 5)
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