Welcome to the weird and wonderful world of record covers from the golden age of LPs


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Country

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On the road again

“Boulevard of Broken Dreams” (1957) Ferlin Husky Capitol Records

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (50 votes, average: 3.78 out of 5)
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Webb master

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Webb Pierce. Country Music Time. (1965) Decca. Beautiful guitar and Nashville Nudie suit.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (29 votes, average: 3.59 out of 5)
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The bunny ranch

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“The Playboy Farmer” Lonnie “Pap” Wilson on Starday. “Jokes, Laffs, Songs & Gags about the Funny Side of Life Or How to Have Fun – Even if You’re Married

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (35 votes, average: 3.26 out of 5)
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Another day at the office

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Honky Tonk and Western Swing star Hank Thompson “Songs for Rounders”   Capitol Records.   (1959)

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (31 votes, average: 3.97 out of 5)
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Rhinestone cowboys

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From 1957, The Wilburn Brothers Teddy and Doyle on Decca. Including That’s When I Miss You / Cry Cry Darling / I Know You Don’t Love Me Anymore / Always Alone / You Win Again / I’ll Sail My Ship Alone / Don’t Sweetheart Me / Time Changes Everything / If It’s Wrong To Love You / One Has My Name / You Can’t Break The Chains Of Love / Much Too Often.

This cover shows an early example of the “Nudie Suit”, which was the creation of mandelin player turned tailor “Nudie” Cohn. Among Nudie’s most famous creations is Elvis Presley’s $10,000 gold lame suit seen on the cover of his “50,000,000 Elvis Fans Can’t Be Wrong” lp.   Nudie also designed Hank William’s white cowboy suit featuring musical notation on the sleeves (like this one above) and Gram Parson’s “Gilded Palace of Sin” suit, which featured pill bottles, pot leaves, naked women, and a huge cross. Many of Roy Roger’s film costumes were also commissioned from Nudie’s of Hollywood. Porter Wagoner was said to have had some 60 or so Nudie suits in his wardrobe, which he became famous for wearing in performance.

The Wilbourn Bros. had 30 charted hits between 1955 and 1972 including their biggest single, 1966’s “Hurt Her Once for Me” and the following year’s classic “Hurt Her Once For Me”. They also notched two Top Ten duets with Ernest Tubb “Hey, Mr. Bluebird” and “Mister Love.” In the late fifties, as partners with steel guitarist Don Helms in the Will-Helm Talent Agency, they introduced the world to Loretta Lynn among others. In 1963, Teddy and Doyle got their own weekly syndicated TV variety series — one of the first country music programs broadcast in color, The Wilburn Brothers Show ran through 1974, providing early exposure to acts including the Oak Ridge Boys, Tammy Wynette and Barbara Mandrell.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (25 votes, average: 2.80 out of 5)
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Guitar hero

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“Fire on the Strings” Joe Maphis, “King of the Strings”

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (22 votes, average: 3.41 out of 5)
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Jeannie C. rider

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Jeannie C. Riley “The Girl Most Likely” on budget Pickwick 33 label.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (32 votes, average: 4.25 out of 5)
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Ghost rider

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“Phantom 309” by Red Sovine on Starday records.   Here he is on the Porter Wagner TV show.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (25 votes, average: 3.44 out of 5)
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Pink elephants

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Johnny Bond   “Here Come the Elephants”   From the collection of Uncle Gil.

Pink Elephants and drunken visions.   Here are the top 100 drinking songs.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (22 votes, average: 3.95 out of 5)
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Everybody loves Jack Davis

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Two by Jack Davis. Courtesy of Uncle Gil. Some more his work here. To any kid who grew up in the Sixties with MAD Magazine (and his many paperback, movie poster, advertising and record cover illustrations), Jack Davis’ charactures and illustrations were just a part of life.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (37 votes, average: 4.46 out of 5)
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